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20130420
20130420
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
violence. all of your efforts. this started. eleven have always. some kind of environment. this case. many of them -- >> okay. first question, yes. a lot did actually have a lot of spin-off benefits. that is a lemon scent. because these laws were passed and there was such a nationwide applaud that the government began -- the parliament became open to the other laws. there we took the other laws that got past because of this one. and also, the issue is so tabooed, even the sexual assault and rape, and these issues are also so tabooed that now people are starting to even the president and prime master and the speeches of the anti sexual-harassment law. okay. now the world is getting very popular. so now it is almost creating a space where even in cestus coming out of the space. so rather than saying incest was it would not to run television a lot of sexual violence and sexual assault and rape is also coming, which is heated. fine. other terms. for example, rape, we do not have that yet. but we are coming close. when is that the case of the new york. we had it outside the un system. this big
to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation the e. rhodes and leona b. carpenter foundation. and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. this week on "to the contrary," first, environmental racism. what it is and does it exist? then, behind the headlines: poison in your sofa, called flame retardants. hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to to the contrary, a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, the climate justice gap. climate change may be a global problem, but the naacp reports it disproportionately affects women, people of color and lower income communities. that's why the naacp launched the climate justice initiative. >> communities of color tend to have these pre-existing vulnerabilities so that somehow when a disaster happens, there's communities that have you know poor housing stock or are under insured or are politically marginalized and all of those factors combine to make a greater vulnerabil
is above sea level rise and certainly when we talk about the environment. as the title of this panel says, along green view. it is absolutely about how the complexities of human decision making, human settlement, individual ambition, always contradictory emotions of people have shape not only what the environment is, we impact it and give them access. but how we think of it to my we formulate the idea of the wild and now often that is based on these often very self-serving tropes that we invented. so the environment is about history, human action. and in this but what i tried to do is to show how some of those crosscurrents work. he said sell thing boils down to the final decisive battle but against the indians to have been an extremely aggressive northern plains tribe who had been the ones first to master horses and had arranged absolutely right through the yellowstone country hunting in the fire all, for example. once there were dealt with the exploration could continue, but one last cautionary note goes back to the question of prison. i think it is very easy when people look at this bo
the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. the immigration bill is hot and heavy, front and center. marco rubio did ginsburg in espagnole. he had five sunday shows, to talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. outink the guns may come not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. mexico, the united states, now japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance to help bring nafta into the 21st century. the three are very much on the u.s. agenda. it shows great forward progress. welcome all of you to what promises to be a truly fascinating session. be second reason this will terrific is because of our panelists. i will say little bit more about the ambassador of mexico. doris meissner, who i served with in the clinton administration. she is one of our grea
is damage to the environment, both long term and immediate. nowhere is it more pressing than china. in city after city, the delegation saw firsthand the air pollution program that evokes images of los angeles in the 1960s and '70s. here wearing a mask outdoors is a fashion statement. global wind patterns is not just a threat to the chinese. >> we feel the impact of it eventually. i think there are opportunities for both sides to collaborate. >> in meetings with chinese officials, the governor found out what works. from tail pipe exhaust laws to air quality districts. >> they know our programs well. they have been studying. >> that may help explain the agreements on the visit that brown signed with chinese officials. four agreements in all. >> china has the largest economic body and largest energy consumers and largest audio consumers and emitters. so we have a lot of opportunities in the future. >> china's challenges are not a lack of political energy as they are the source of the physical energy. coal. railroad cars full of coal like these in the city of nanging are needed every day to fue
am determined to facilitate the economic environment and raise the tax rate. based on provision, comprehensive tax reform act. and japan's own entitlement reform to put the government expenditure in check. previously the g 20 meetings. together with other member nations, we aim the primary balance to fiscal the -- fiscal year 2015 and from 2010 and we also keeping family balance, by 2020. we are going to publish medium-term fiscal plans around the middle of this year. the second interest-rate hike is avoidable. economics should take a deep root for an economy to see sustainable growth. finally let me say only a few words about what kind of country japan not to be. japan should be a place where effort, japan must be a place where thinkers, risktakers can be given opportunities not just once but many times. prime minister presents a chance for a second coming in japan. japan must be a place where the sense continues. japan must be a place for innovation. japan is on the cutting edge of new medical technology. the nobel prize winner said japan is a country that is a bonus to bringi
of exchanges going on right now. forward to a post 2013 environment, to you believe these multibillion-dollar payments will continue regardless of their being an american presence or nato troop presence in afghanistan? maintaineve we need to a constructive and effective relationship with pakistan. we need to recognize the real threat that pakistan has inside of its own borders. from my perspective we have to do whatever it takes to ensure that our national vital interests is protected. >> one of the things i am always looking into that aid is whether or not it does serve the military. you are saying we need to do whatever it takes to continue that relationship. are you saying that payments of that size and nature are going to be what is required in the long run? >> i believe it is in our best interest to continue to develop the pakistani army in ensuring that they can effectively deal issues in their borders. i cannot tell you that every program we have in place is one we ought to assisting in the future. that is not something i paying particular attention to in my current duties. i am
they have total visual environment, they are trying to evacuate any residents in the area from the neighborhood, and as was noted, now they went to move, the flash-bangs, be methodical. the one thing, they're not certain but they're operating under the assumption there are explosives in that yard. >> you know, i think one of the best examples for your viewers, i'm sure many of them saw "zero dark thirty." there was an initial assault phase, helicopters crashing in and all, then it seemed like minutes went by as people then started deliberately moving through and that's kind of a parallel to what you're going to see happen here tonight. but i think within a few hours of darkness, this could be favorably resolved. >> one of our producers is near the scene. lawrence, what are you seeing and hearing? >> well, i'm at washburn and chester streets, which is about a block from franklin street, where i'm told from a boston police source they have a suspect cornered in the backyard of a home. i'm also told that they're using flash-bangs to try to get him out. the number one priority for
's another power we can use the environment. that is the power of persuasion. here we are lucky as both of us ex-prime ministers, he and i have met a whole bunch0s ceos and they should remember their patriotism and hire more, or pay more to their employees. it is -- for the first time in many years an increasing number of companies are willing to pay more. however, getting rid of denation -- deflation mindset alone cannot hamper long-lasting recovery. we most leave people with expectation to sustainable economic growth. and for the purpose we must have two downside risk. one, inflation without growth. two, interest rate hike without growth. let me understand one by one. let's assume that you now have rising cpi, but you have no pay rise. the economy is that is a bad inflation. people should suffer then. it is right here that the third bazooka should come into play. the third bazooka, if you recall, is a package of growth enhancement policies. i know it's hard to come by. i am not saying we can do very easily. still, it takes us only to look into miller -- into mirror to see who you are and th
for two senators to reach a deal. but that is sort of the way it has, that the environment now down there. is that deal of theirs between the two of them something that is going move forward as legislation? that will be taken seriously by both parties? >> i think it will be taken seriously. i don't know if it wll pass or not. we should be focusing on prosecuting and punishing and preventing violent criminals. and we should be safeguarding the constitutional rights of law-abiding citizens. all of us were horrified by what happened at sandyhook. i have two children at home and to parent could see chirp senselessly murdered and not be anything but speechless and just taken aback at the depravity and the hor are of it. but it's sad so many politicians are trying to take advantage of the tragedy not to take legislation to target violent criminals but working to take away the second amendment right to keep an bear arms of the law abiding peaceful citizens. let me tell you something interestingost people don't know -- >> lou: senator, could i to this. take this opportunity to go to break very qu
mean, you know, you really -- these are complicated environments and you have to have a feeling for people and the built to deal with people and be trusted. i think at a place like -- you have to be a superb scholar and teacher and well respected. because -- people have to respect you if they come from an academic -- >> you leading the mt talented intellectuals in the world. and they want somebody they can respect as a conversation partner. and i think it's out of th)iĆ” large faculty a couple of thousand people there better be a few who can lead. and my job is to find them. one of my jobs is to pick the talent, give them committee assignments and administrative jobs that would bring out the talent. >> do you have any idea what bart giamatti saw in you? >> i don't know, i was well organized. >> his provost, bilbray national guard, was a mentor of mine and i think bill sort of called me to his attention and it was to bill that i got to know him and got very important assignments even in the university so in may you'll preside over the graduation for the last time. what do you hop
to go and -- to go into a morbid environment. he had enough to think about. so yes, she wrote letters. she didn't have many friends, unfortunately. but she did have this wonderful family who kept her going and there always seemed to be somebody there. as far as reading, i don't think she did very much which was a shame because she was a very intellectual woman, highly educated. that intellect and that wonderful education seemed wasted in some ways. >> next question comes from bonnie who is watching us in cincinnati. hi, bonnie, you're on the air. >> hi. thank you for taking my call. this is a most intriguing subject. i do collect albums from the 1840's and 1850's of the central united states. and i do own a journal that was written by a family member of william henry harrison. the harrison family coming from cincinnati. after his death, frequently the letters that do i have, i'm not a member of that family, however i do have several of the letters and albums hand written, journals, and frequently similar to mrs. pierce, in the older women, elders of the family, there is the serious co
, will probably be here working well past the year 2050 and probably, in today's environment, past the year 2060. our current retirement model is designed to give an employee a defined pension after a long career and it's a model that made a lot of sense in the 19 40's and 1950's but is not going to be appropriate for the 20 40's and the 20 50's. our world is becoming far so dynamic to make promises about pensions 40 and 50 years down the road. the benefit of a defined contribution system is that it gives employees options to consider. if job changes are possible, why hold people to benefits that they may not be able to use for 50 years? e're currently on a trajectory to hit about 400,000 career employees by the year 2017 and that's with all the changes we propose, the six to five day and the network changes as we shrink down. and after we reach that number, it's going to give us a pretty lean work force. we have a pretty lean work force right now from the standpoint of the network and the six-day delivery. but after that we will start hiring people. we estimate between 2017 and 2027, depending
is deeply troubling in an increasingly restrictive environment of civil liberties. this includes the measures with respect to registration as foreign agents and also restrictions on press and internet freedom. we made clear with human dialogue but we remain committed to open dialogue with civil seent supporting their efforts. >> i do a follow-up on that? >> sure. >> in the past -- i think the u.s. government has talked a lot about their concern of human rights abuse in chechnya. i'm wondering if you think the events in boston are going to change the way the government would see human rights in chechnya? >> with respect to the ongoing investigation in boston, i have to reiterate the secretary's comment that it would be highly norptse to make comments at this time. i can tell you this has been part of our human rights reporting on russia since 1995. you will find quite a bit of information on this year's report and they note serious human rights abuses taking place and human rights violations committed by authorities and militants. >> this is going to be the last question. >> you m
and present one we have to start tackling now rather than later. i am determined to facilitate the environment and basic conception tax rate, based on the provision of a comprehensive tax reform. you must also address japan's own entitlement reform to that the growth of the government expenditure in check. previously at the g20 meetings, together with other member nations we stick to it. wait a minute having the balance ratio to gdp by fiscal year 2015 than that in 2010. we also aim at achieving by 2020. we are going to publish medium-term fiscal consolidation plan around the middle of this year. the second interest rate hike is avoidable. economics should take deep root for the economically to seek sustainable growth. finally, before conclusion, let me say only a few words about what kind of country japan not to be. japan must be a place where the road needs effort. japan must be a place where risktakers can be given opportunities not just once, but many times. also, ex-prime minister present the chance for the second coming in japan. japan must be at face and a sense shotmaker cain mused, ja
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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